Homeless Students (McKinney-Vento)

homless

homeless espanol

Homeless children and unaccompanied youth have the right to a free appropriate public education.

1Who is considered homeless?

  • Students who are doubled-up (sharing housing with others)due to loss of housing or economic hardship.

  • Students living in motels/hotels, trailer parks, campgrounds, or emergency shelters.

  • Students that have a nighttime residence that is a place not designed for sleeping accommodations, (i.e. park, abandoned building, etc.)

2. Does residency have to be proven?

  • The school cannot require proof of residency that might prevent or delay the enrollment of school-aged children.

3. Is there any reason to delay enrolling a homeless child?

  • No, they must be placed in school immediately. The lack of school records cannot prevent a homeless child from enrolling in school.

  • A homeless child does not have to wait until academic or health records arrive to attend school.

4. Is there assistance available?
Students that qualify as homeless are eligible for the following services: Free meals (qualify automatically for Child Nutrition Programs); Tutoring; and school supplies.

For more information or if you know of a student who you suspect may qualify as homeless or unaccompanied youth please call:

Kathy Scott
325-574-8675, Ext 5111

IT'S THE LAW!!
Public Law 107-110 McKinney-Vento Homeless Education Assistance Improvement Act of 2001

MCKINNEY-VENTO INFORMATION FOR PARENTS AND SCHOOL AGED CHILDREN

The Federal McKinney-Vento Act and Texas state law guarantee that you can enroll in school if you live

  • In a shelter (family shelter, domestic violence shelter, youth shelter or transitional living program);

  • In a motel, hotel, or weekly-rate housing;

  • In a housing or apartment with more than one family because of economic hardship or loss;

  • In substandard housing (no electricity, no water, and/or no heat); or

  • With friends or family because you are a runaway or unaccompanied youth.

If you live in one of these situations, you do NOT need to provide

  • Proof of residency,

  • Immunization records or a TB skin test result,

  • Birth Certificate

  • School records, or

  • Legal guardianship papers to enroll in or attend school.

You may also:

  • Continue to attend the school in which you were last enrolled, even if you have moved away from that school’s attendance zone or district;

  • Receive transportation from your current residence back to our school of origin;

  • Qualify automatically for Child Nutrition Programs (Free and Reduced-Price breakfast, lunch and other district food programs);

  • Contact the district liaison to resolve any disputes that arise during the enrollment process.

If you have questions about enrolling in school or need assistance with enrolling in school, contact: Kathy Scott at (325)574-8675 ext. 5111

MCKINNEY-VENTO INFORMACIÓN PARA LOS PADRES Y LOS NIÑOS DE EDAD ESCOLAR

La ley federal de McKinney-Vento y las leyes estatales de Texas garantizan que puedes inscribirte en la escuela si vives

  • En un albergue (centro de hospedaje familiar, refugio para victimas de violencia doméstica asilo para jóvenes);

  • En un motel, hotel, o apartamento de renta por semana;

  • Compartiendo una vivienda con otra familia o algún pariente a causa do no poder encontrar alojamiento o por falta de recursos económicos;

  • En un edificio abandonado, vehiculo, parque, o en la calle al aire libre;

  • Con una madre o un padre de cría u otro adulto que no es tu padre o guardián legal;

  • En un casa o vivienda sin electricidad, sin agua y/o sin calefacción;

  • Con amigos, parientes o familiares porque eres un joven fugitivo o sin la compañía de tus padres o guardián legal.

Si vives bajo una de estas condiciones, NO tienes que proporcionar a la escuela

  • Prueba que vives en el distrito,

  • Certificado o datos de inmunizaciones,

  • Certificado o acta de nacimiento, o

  • Archivos o documentos escolares, o

  • Carta de poder o documentos de custodia para inscribirte o asistir a la escuela.

Puedes también:

  • Seguir asistiendo a la ultima escuela donde estabas inscrito, aunque has cambiado de residencia o domicilio y estas afuera de la zona de asistencia para esa escuela o ese distrito escolar;

  • Recibir servicios de transportación de tu domicilio actual a la escuela donde estabas asistiendo;

  • Participar automáticamente de programas de nutrición y alimentación por parte del distrito;

  • Participar de todos los programas y actividades escolares que se ofrecen a los demás estudiantes y a los cuales puedes ser admitido; y

  • Comunicarte con el oficial de enlace del distrito para ayudarte en resolver cualquier desacuerdo que se presente durante el proceso de inscripción en la escuela.

Si tienes preguntas sobre tus derechos o cómo inscribirte en la escuela o si necesitas ayuda para inscribirte en la escuela, comunícate con:

Kathy Scott, McKinney-Vento at (325)574-8675 ext. 5111

Multilingual Programs

The Snyder ISD multilingual education programs supports and monitors an aligned curriculum with corresponding progress measures supported by differentiated professional development and implemented with fidelity resulting in increased student achievement for all. As a team, we are focused on developing the cognitive, linguistic, and affective domains of emerging language learners. We believe in bilingual, biliterate, and bicultural environments, to provide equitable educational opportunities for the community that we serve.

Vision 

The emerging English Language Learner in Snyder ISD will graduate as prepared and responsible adults with the necessary college and career skills needed to be productive citizens.

Mision 

Our mission is to ensure that all emerging English Language Learners achieve their highest potential through rigorous academic opportunities by providing research-based instructional practices that address their affective, linguistic, and academic needs.

The purpose of the bilingual education program and the English as a Second Language (ESL) program in Snyder ISD is to enable emerging language learners with limited English proficiency to develop fluency in oral language, reading comprehension, and writing skills in English. The programs focus on the development of literacy and academic skills in the primary language and English through the use of second language learning methods. We strive to meet the educational needs of each linguistically diverse student by recognizing the affective, linguistic, and cognitive domains, to enable students successful and equitable participation in regular instructional programs.

The Snyder ISD bilingual education program cultivates bilingual, biliterate, and bicultural environments, and offers robust support to emerging language learners to further develop proficiencies as critical thinkers and leaders, which fosters the capacity for being significant contributors within our diverse, competitive, and globally connected world.

Emerging English and Spanish proficient students will develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in English and Spanish at high linguistic and academic proficiency. Culturally proficient students will develop an understanding of how languages, cultures, and people impact our global society.

Guiding principles
Being proficient in the first and second language produces higher academic achievement. Language proficiency means having both basic interpersonal communications skills and cognitive academic language skills. Academic proficiency in the first language forms the basis for academic proficiency in the second language. And a second language is learned best through exposures to comprehensible input in a supportive environment. We believe when students feel good about themselves, their achievement cannot help but experience greater improvements.

Instructional practice
Bilingual teachers use small group instruction and other strategies that may include peer-tutoring, use of integrated technology, and cooperative learning. Students may be homogeneously or heterogeneously grouped by ability and/or proficiency levels, individual needs, a random distribution, and/or according to assignments or projects. Bilingual teachers also work with individual groups (e.g., guided reading, etc.) while other students may undertake individual assignments.

English for speakers of other languages
Snyder High School offers English for Speakers of Other Language (ESOL) programming. These ESOL environments are academic enrichment classes that are available to assist students in content area classes. Freshmen ESOL students take the ESOL 1 in addition to English 1 and Sophomore ESOL students take ESOL 2 in addition to English 2.

The English as a Second Language program (ESL) is an intensive English language instruction program provided by ESL certified teachers who are trained in effective second language acquisition methods. The goal of ESL programs is for emerging English language learners to attain full proficiency in English in order to participate equitably in school. Snyder ISD has the ESL program in grades PreK-12 at all campuses.

ESL programming
Students suspected of needing ESL programming and supports are given an Oral Language Proficiency test administered on the basis of data obtained from a Home Language Survey completed at the time of campus enrollment and district registration. A Language Proficiency Assessment Committee (LPAC), made up of a parent(s)/guardian(s) representative, administrators, and ESL teachers, review yearly student placements, programs, and progress.

The purpose of the ELL programming is to enable emerging English language learners, who are found to be Limited English Proficient (LEP) students, to become competent in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing English. Snyder ISD is committed to providing emerging language learners equal educational access. We provide ESL endorsed instructional staff who help cultivate robust learning environments that facilitates building knowledge and learning in content areas simultaneous with English language acquisition. LEP students benefit from these enhanced learning opportunities and are better able to experience early academic success while their skill for English as a second language continues to develop and emerge. Snyder ISD also values and celebrates diversity and each individual student's cultural heritage which serves to increase self-assurance and greater confidence.

Parent(s)/guardian(s) involvement 
Snyder ISD values parent(s)/guardian(s) of LEP students to be fully engaged with their child(s) learning. Full participation and involvement is always welcome and fully encouraged. Parent(s)/guardian(s) are invited to visit ESL classes and view the program. We also encourage parent(s)/guardian(s) to share information with their child(s) teacher(s) regarding culture and language, to serve as translators, liaisons, and as LPAC members, and participate in all activities at school. Finally, we rely on a viable partnership with parent(s)/guardian(s) to help keep their children fully engaged and achieving consistent attendance so they are able to realize the maximum benefit from their educational opportunity and ELL programming.

Cultural diversity
Campuses may include diversity as an objective in the Campus Improvement Plan (CIP) and are encouraged to develop a cultural calendar on a yearly basis that includes celebrations of individuals such as culturally diverse artisans, story tellers, dancers, and musicians. Campuses also hold ESL parent(s)/guardian(s) focus groups who provide cultural expertise and work with staff concerning culture. These focus groups also serve Snyder ISD as translators, liaisons, and as LPAC members. Finally, schools plan on campus celebratory displays that encourage the an enhanced appreciation of diverse cultures.

Instructional practice
Students participating in the ESL program in Snyder ISD receive intensive instruction in English from teachers certified in ESL. Bilingual instructional staff districtwide scaffold their lessons to ensure the academic content is comprehensible for all students while they develop academic language.

Bilingual instructional staff at both Snyder Primary School and Snyder Intermediate School use small group instruction and other strategies that may include peer-tutoring, use of integrated technology, and cooperative learning. Students may be homogeneously or heterogeneously grouped by ability and/or proficiency levels, individual needs, a random distribution, and/or according to assignments or projects. Bilingual instructional staff also work with individual groups (e.g., guided reading, etc.) while other students may undertake individual assignments.

In addition to the above stated practices, bilingual instructional staff at the Snyder Junior High School work with LEP students who are enrolled in general education Language Arts and ESL classes. These LEP students may also receive additional ESL supports through academic achievement.

In addition to the above stated practices, Snyder High School offers English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) programming. These ESOL environments are academic enrichment classes that are available to assist students in content area classes. Freshmen ESOL students take the ESOL 1 in addition to English 1 and Sophomore ESOL students take ESOL 2 in addition to English 2.

Funding
In compliance with all state, local, and federal regulations, concerning the education of second language learners, the ESL program of Snyder ISD is funded according to the number of students enrolled.

The following resources are designed to facilitate greater understanding of the multilingual education programming for parent(s)/guardian(s) of emerging language learners who are Limited English Proficient (LEP) students within Snyder ISD. Included are several Texas Education Agency (TEA) resources.

  • Supporting English Learners in Texas (TEA)

  • Parent and Families of English Language Learners (TXEL)

  • Process for identifying students for English as a Second Language (Guide)

  • Tips for Families with English Learners (Guide) (En Español)

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A UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY FOR ELEMENTARY STUDENTS TO LEARN A SECOND LANGUAGE!

The Dual Language program is an accelerated program that begins in Kindergarten. Program goals are:

  • Bilingualism (the ability to speak fluently in two languages) 

  • Biliteracy (the ability to read and write in two languages)

  • Bicultural (understanding the cultural attitudes and customs)  

  • Academic achievement equal to or greater than that of students in other classrooms

LEARN MORE!

 Parents will be required to attend one of the following meetings via zoom:

  • Monday, May 4, 2020 at 6:30 pm

  • Wednesday, May 13, 2020 at 1:00 pm

  • Thursday, May 21, 2020 at 6:30 pm

LEARN MORE!

Complete the Dual Language Parent Interest Form for a Zoom meeting link.

Do you have questions about enrolling your child in Pre-K or Kindergarten at Snyder Primary School this fall?

Watch the replay Q&A with Snyder Primary School Principal Canita Rhodes and Assistant Principal Courtney Boyd. We will discuss eligibility, registration, the dual-language program, curriculum, and more!

REGISTRATION:

Pre-K and Kindergarten registration will be held June 22 - 25, 2020 at Snyder Primary School. We will follow CDC recommendations and limit the number of people who are in the building during registration.

Monday, June 22: 9am - 3pm

Tuesday, June 23: 9am - 3pm

Wednesday, June 24: 12pm - 6pm

Thursday, June 25: 9am-3pm

Students must be 4 years old (Pre-K)* or 5 years old (Kinder) before September 1, 2020 to be eligible.

If you have any questions, please reach out to Snyder Primary School 325-574-8600.

ELIGIBILITY: 

To be eligible for enrollment in a free prekindergarten class, a child must be at least three years of age on or before September 1 of the current school year (if a 3-year-old program is available) or four years of age on or before September 1 of the current school year (if only a 4-year-old program is available) and meet at least one of the following eligibility requirements:

  • is unable to speak and comprehend the English language; or

  • is educationally disadvantaged (which means a student eligible to participate in the
    national free or reduced-price lunch program... guidelines can be found 
    here); or

  • is homeless, as defined by 42 U.S.C. Section 1143a, regardless of the residence of the child, of either parent of the child, or of the child's guardian or other person having lawful control of the child; or

  • is the child of an active duty member of the armed forces of the United States, including the state military forces or a reserve component of the armed forces, who is ordered to active duty by proper authority; or

  • is the child of a member of the armed forces of the United States, including the state military forces or a reserve component of the armed forces, who was injured or killed while serving on active duty; or

  • is or ever has been in the conservatorship of the Department of Family and Protective Services (foster care) following an adversary hearing held as provided by Section 262.201, Family Code; or

  • is the child of a person eligible for the Star of Texas Award as: a peace officer under Section 3106.002, Government Code; a firefighter under Section 3106.003, Government Code; or an emergency medical first responder under Section 3106.004, Government Code. 

Source: Texas Education Agency Pre-Kindergarten FAQ Page

DOCUMENTS FOR REGISTRATION

Required Documents:

LINKS: ENRICHMENT PRE-KINDERGARTEN:

QUESTIONS?

Please call (325) 574-8600 or email questions@snyderisd.net.

CIRCLE PROGRESS MONITORING

Throughout the school year, students in your child’s prekindergarten classroom are being given special activities to help their teacher track their progress. The teacher looks at the results of this “progress monitoring” to determine if the children are developing the skills they will need for kindergarten and their later school years. The CIRCLE Progress Monitoring tool helps your child’s teacher identify learning areas in which your child is developing a level of understanding that is expected for his or her age. The tool also identifies areas in which your child might need more targeted support and practice. If your child is meeting or exceeding the expectation for his or her age, the teacher will offer additional supports to help your child progress further. If your child needs targeted support for a particular skill, then the teacher might use a variety of different teaching strategies to support that area of development.

Circle Progress Monitoring Documents

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Special Services

Children are special and so is their education in Snyder ISD. We believe that all individuals are born with inherent value and that all individuals need to feel safe and secure in their learning environment. Further, we believe that all individuals deserve an environment that is conducive to mental, physical, and spiritual growth. And, we also believe that education is a shared responsibility and that personal relationships, especially with parent(s)/guardian(s) and students, are essential and vital to learning.

It is the mission of the Special Services Department to actively respond to the needs of students with disabilities, and their families, by providing supports that will encourage and foster empowerment, independence, and inclusiveness in all aspects of the educational experience in school and beyond. We seek to develop educational programs for students with disabilities which are relevant and adaptable to the student’s needs. This department serves and meets the needs of Snyder ISD stakeholders through oversight and implementation of services for Dyslexia and other Related Disorders, Section 504, and Special Education.

We are committed to collaborative process that includes parent(s)/guardian(s), teachers, administrators, specialist, assessment personnel, and all other relevant staff, based on student needs. We believe with proper support and opportunities, every student can learn and succeed. Snyder ISD provides a continuum of services determined on an individual basis through processes designed to cultivate student success and improved academic, behavioral, and social outcomes.

All services provided by Snyder ISD through general education, Section 504, special education, and/or other related services, are at no cost to the individual student or parent(s)/guardian(s). If you are concerned about your child’s learning, contact your child’s campus administrator, principal, or teacher(s). You may also contact the district's Director of Special Services. See below for contact details.

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SNYDER ISD SPECIAL SERVICES

Stanfield Special Services Building
4300 Avenue V., Snyder, TX 79549
(p) 325-574-8600 | (f) 325-574-8693

Dyslexia means a disorder of constitutional origin manifest by a difficulty in learning to read, write, or spell, despite conventional instruction, adequate intelligence, and sociocultural opportunity; and, a Related Disorder includes disorders similar to or related to dyslexia, such as developmental auditory imperception, dysphasia, specific developmental dyslexia, developmental dysgraphia, and developmental spelling disability.

Dyslexia and related disorders are a language and learning based disability referring to a cluster of symptoms resulting in difficulties with language skill such as spelling, writing and speaking. These cluster of symptoms are often just referred to collectively as dyslexia. The exact causes for dyslexia are not completely clear. Studies have shown there are differences in the way the brain develops and functions in those impacted. It can occur among all groups regardless of age, race, gender, or income; and, research has established that dyslexia can run in families. Dyslexia disorders are not due to either lack of intelligence or the desire to learn. With appropriate strategies students with dyslexia can learn successfully. Dyslexia is not behavioral, psychological, motivational, or social, and it is a misconception that people with dyslexia see backward. Its impact can change at different stages in a person's life.

Characteristics
An individual with dyslexia typically lacks an awareness of sounds in words, rhymes, or sequence of sounds and syllables in words. They tend to have a difficulty to accurately decode nonsense or unfamiliar words as well as difficulty in reading single words in isolation. There is generally a lack or reading fluency and the individual fails to read smoothly and at an appropriate pace. Dyslexics have a variable degree of difficulty learning the names of letters and their associated sounds, learning to spell, rapid naming of familiar objects, colors, or letters, with phonological memory (holding information about sounds and words in memory), with learning and reproducing the alphabet in correct sequence (in either oral or written form); and, often there is a family history of similar problems.

Assessment
Recommendation for assessment may include results of some or all of the following including teacher observations and concerns, academic progress reports, samples of school work, parent(s)/guardian(s) conferences, testing for limited English proficiency, evidence of adequate intelligence, speech and language screening through a referral process, K-2 results of Texas Primary Reading Inventory (TPRI), district designated assessment, and current state student assessment programs.

Dyslexia program specialist
Ms. Andrea Crane, a Certified Academic Language Therapist, serves and supports Snyder ISD students districtwide as a Dyslexia Specialist. She is a proud alumna of Snyder High School, Texas Tech University, and of the Scottish Rite Dyslexia training program. Ms. Crane provides assessment and intervention for dyslexia directly, explicitly, and systematically, to teach an awareness of the sounds of language, letter-sound associations, vocabulary, and strategies for understanding written language.

Services to students with dyslexic or related disorders
Most people with dyslexia need help from a teacher, tutor, or therapist trained in using a multi-sensory, structured language approach. It is important for these individuals to be taught by a method that employs all pathways of learning at the same time: seeing, hearing, touching, writing, and speaking. Many individuals with dyslexia need this type of instruction so they can move forward using explicit instruction in the decoding of written language. The letter-sound system is critical. This code must be taught bit by bit, in a sequential and cumulative way. There must be a systematic teaching of the rules governing written language.

Texas has a long history of supporting the fundamental skill of reading. This history includes a focus on early identification and intervention for children who experience reading difficulties. In support of dyslexia, the Texas Legislature has passed legislation that provides guidelines for school districts to follow as they identify and provide services for students with dyslexia and related disorders. Guidelines for the program are available in the Texas Education Agency (TEA) Dyslexia Handbook (En Español). You can also learn more about procedures, personnel, and timelines related to dyslexia activities, by viewing the Snyder ISD Special Services operating procedures for dyslexia services.

Most students with dyslexia and/or a related disorder are typically served through Section 504.

Funding
There are no federal or state monies specifically designated for the dyslexia program. The district designates funds for the program. Each campus has a budget and funds are designated for the district level.

Response to Intervention (RtI) is a system of supports put in place to provide high-quality education to students. It was originally developed as an overall framework for prediction, remediation, and prevention of negative outcomes common for students with disabilities. It derives from the foundational components of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), including nondiscriminatory evaluation, appropriate education, and procedural due process.

RtI, designed to aid in the identification of learning disabilities, other learning issues, and behavior problems, improves instructional quality and provides students with appropriate academic opportunities. It requires the implementation of a differentiated curriculum with different instructional methods and tiers of increasingly intensive, scientific, research-based interventions.

When RtI is implemented on a consistent, ongoing basis, students with disabilities thrive, as do other students who have no label but who may experience academic challenges along the way. RtI puts into place a system that is sensitive to the learning needs, growth, and progress of all students

Components of RtI
RtI uses universal screening to better understand how each student is performing on critical academic tasks in the core curriculum. Universal screening helps provide a baseline for educators to develop strategies to meet the student where they are in terms of academic skill and understanding. RtI uses evidenced-based practices and curriculum. When educators use established, evidence-supported methods, they can have reasonable confidence that students will respond to instruction. Monitoring is an ongoing assessment, using both formal and informal methodologies, that provides data for educators to determine which students continue to struggle. This monitoring enables a more fluid and on demand adjustment to student educational plans that facilitate greater capacity to meet the needs of individual learners.

Tiered interventions
RtI is a tiered intervention. Interventions begin at the Tier 1 level of instruction. More than 90% of RtI occurs as Tier 1 instruction and is provided in all general education classrooms by general education classroom teachers. In Tier 1, all students receive high‐quality core instruction with grade level standards and learning targets, research‐based best practices, flexible grouping, differentiated instruction, and ongoing assessment and monitoring.

Tier 2 is a more deliberate, direct and explicit instruction, that carries with it an increased focus on teaching practices and how students are taught. Generally, between 5 - 10% of students have need for Tier 2, which includes all of the Tier 1 supports with the addition of an increased intensity of small group, clear learning targets based on assessment data, supplemental interventions with a minimum of bi-weekly sessions, and continued assessment and monitoring.

Tier 3, the most intensive level of instruction, is typically required for only 1 - 5% of students. Tier 3 includes all the supports of both Tiers 1 and 2, with the addition of an increased frequency of skills-specific interventions, the introduction and involvement of specialized staff, a minimum of 3 sessions per week, and continued assessment and monitoring.

RtI is not a special education program, nor a pathway to special education services; however, RtI and special education services can and should work closely together to provide high quality instruction for students of all abilities.

RtI can and should be both academic and behavior focused.

Core beliefs
Snyder ISD believes every child will learn and can achieve high standards, given appropriate support. Learning includes both academic and social competencies. Every member of the education community will continue to grow, learn, and reflect. And all staff, at all levels, are responsible for every student.

girls smiling 504

Our mission is to assist campuses in providing a quality education to students with disabilities that allows them to achieve their greatest potential and prepares them for future success.

Our purpose includes  accepting referrals from individuals who suspect a student has a disability. We provide guidance to facilitate the determination of a student’s eligibility and needed services. We educate teachers, campuses, parent(s)/guardian(s), and the community on Section 504 laws and procedures. We assist campuses in following laws that mandate the referral, eligibility, and provided services for students identified under Section 504. And, we help create the individual accommodation plan (IAP) to ensure student success in all academic and extracurricular areas.

Understanding Section 504
Section 504 is a federal civil rights law that focuses on the non-discrimination of students with disabilities. The law says that a public school, or any other federally funded public facility, cannot discriminate because of a disability and students eligible under Section 504 must be given the same opportunities to participate in academic and extracurricular activities as their non-disabled peers. Under Section 504, students with disabilities may receive accommodations and services to ensure that their individual educational needs are met as adequately as those of non-disabled students.

To be eligible for Section 504, a disabling condition must affect one of the major life activities. A comprehensive guide created by the U. S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights is available for download and/or viewing. For additional information, please see the 504 Resource Guide; or, for more information about the rights of parents of eligible children, or for answers to any questions you might have about identification, evaluation, and placement into Section 504 programs, please contact the Snyder ISD Special Services Department at 325-574-8686.

§504 CHILD FIND NOTICE
Pursuant to Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the District has a 
child find duty to identify, refer, evaluate and if eligible, provide a free, appropriate public education to disabled students. For additional information about the rights of parents of eligible children, or for answers to any questions you might have about identification, evaluation and placement into Section 504 programs, please contact the District’s Director of Special Services. See below for contact details.

helping on computer

MORE INFORMATION

PROGRAMS AND SERVICES

Under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), to be eligible for special education and related services, a student must meet the federal definition of a disability. There are specific categories of disability under IDEA. Special education and related services will be made available to all eligible students ages 3 – 21 (services will be made available to eligible students on their third birthday). Children who have been identified as having a hearing or visual impairment are eligible for special education services at birth.

Special education is specially designed instruction that addresses the unique needs of a student eligible to receive special education services. Special education includes the related services a student needs to access their educational program.

Snyder ISD is committed to a collaborative process that includes parent(s)/guardian(s), teachers, administrators, specialist, assessment personnel, and all other relevant staff, based on student needs. You can learn more about procedures, personnel, and timelines related to collaboration activities, by viewing the Snyder ISD Special Services operating procedures for parent participation.

We believe with proper support and opportunities, every student can learn and succeed. Snyder ISD provides a continuum of services determined on an individual basis through processes designed to cultivate student success and improved academic, behavioral, and social outcomes. Special education services are provided to enhance appropriate educational opportunities for all students with disabilities. With high expectations for success, students with disabilities are prepared to become life-long learners and contributing members of the community.

All services provided by Snyder ISD through general education, Section 504, special education, and/or other related services, are at no cost to the individual student or parent(s)/guardian(s). If you are concerned about your child’s learning, contact your child’s campus administrator, principal, or teacher(s). You may also contact the district's Director of Special Services. See below for contact details.

boy writing

Snyder ISD is ready, willing and able to identify and serve all children with disabilities residing within its jurisdiction who are in need of special education and related services.

The term special education means specially designed instruction, at no cost to parent(s)/guardian(s), to meet the unique needs of a child with a disability. The term child with a disability means the child must meet eligibility criteria for at least one of the 13 disabilities specifically outlined in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and, as a result of the disability, has a need for specially designed instruction that can only be provided through special education. Parent(s)/guardian(s) who suspect that their child may have a disability should contact the child’s campus administrator, principal, or teacher(s) to discuss a referral to the campus Response to Intervention (RtI) team.

The district’s child find duty also extend to students with disabilities who are placed in private schools and/or are home schooled by their parent(s)/guardian(s). If you are concerned about your child’s learning, or would like additional information related to referral, please contact the district's Director of Special Services. See below for contact details.

How old does a child need to be in order to be evaluated?
Students who may have a visual or auditory impairment can be referred at birth. For other suspected disabilities, any student between the ages of 3 and 21 can be referred.

Who usually recognizes the possible disability?
Often it is a parent(s)/guardian(s) or family member, pediatrician(s), preschool teacher(s), and family friends may also notice a possible disability.

Who does the evaluation?
A multi-disciplinary team of professionals conducts the evaluation. This may include an educational diagnostician, a Speech Language Pathologist (SLP), and a Licensed Specialist in School Psychology (LSSP). The parent(s)/guardian(s) is part of the team as is a teacher(s) if the student is in school. You can learn more about procedures, personnel, and timelines related to evaluation activities, by viewing the Snyder ISD Special Services operating procedures for evaluation.

How long does the process take?
From the time the parent(s)/guardian(s) signs consent for evaluation, the team has 45 school days to evaluate and complete its report. Then within the next 30 calendar days, the team will schedule a meeting to review the evaluation and make recommendations based on their findings.

What disabilities are identified through the school district’s Child Find program?
A Full and Individual Evaluation (FIE) is done to identify a disabling condition in the multiple areas including speech impairment (SI), orthopedic impairment (OI), other health impairment (OHI), traumatic brain injury (TBI), intellectual disability (ID), autism (AU) spectrum disorder, specific learning disability (SLD), visual impairment (VI), auditory impairment (AI), deaf-blind (DB), and multiple disabilities (MD).

How do I refer my child?
Parent(s)/guardian(s) of Pre-K aged children who are not enrolled in a Snyder ISD school, or who are home-schooled and/or enrolled in a private school, who are within the attendance zone of Snyder ISD, may contact the Special Services Department for more information related to the child find referral process.

Where do I go for more information?
More information may be found on the Updates to Special Education page and from our Child Find Pamphlet.

Administration

Matthew Nelson
Director Special Services
Stanfield 209 | 325-574-8900

Marcia Lear
Administrative Assistant Special Services 
Stanfield 200 | 325-574-8686 ext. 5500

Assessment Personnel

Christie Smith
Educational Diagnostician 
Snyder High School 
Stanfield 207 | 325-574-8686 ext. 6708

Dawnita Nelson
Educational Diagnostician 
Snyder Intermediate School 
Stanfield 202 | 325-574-8686 ext. 5310 

Lacey Bufkin
Speech Language Pathologist  
Snyder Primary School 
Stanfield 206 | 325-574-8686 ext. 7476

Linda Clark
Speech Language Pathologist
Snyder Intermediate, Junior High, and High School  
Stanfield 206 | 325-574-8686 ext. 5506

Stacey Gawelko
Educational Diagnostician 
Snyder Junior High School 
Stanfield 203 | 325-574-8686 ext. 5507

Starla Gonzalez
Educational Diagnostician 
Snyder Primary School 
Stanfield 205 | 325-574-8686 ext. 7007

Instructional Specialists

Erica Hayes
O&M/VI
Snyder ISD 
Stanfield 206 | 325-574-8686 ext. 3403

Sally Miller
AI/VI
Snyder ISD 
Stanfield 206 | 325-574-8686 ext. 7521

Speech Services

Julie Proctor
Speech Clerk
Snyder ISD
Stanfield 206 | 325-574-8686

Tiffany Proctor
Speech Language Pathology Assistant 
Snyder Primary School 
Stanfield 206 | 325-574-8686 ext. 7366

This page is for special education records only. Requests for non special education records (attendance, email, nurse, discipline, etc.) must be requested through the campus or the Superintendent’s office.

Parent(s)/guardian(s) requesting copies of their child's special education records should:

  1. download the Special Education Records Request form

  2. completely fill out the form providing all the necessary information

  3. sign, and ..

  4. return the completed and signed form by email or fax it to 325-574-8693.

If you are unable to complete and/or submit the request on-line or by fax, please print, fill out, and take the completed form to the  Special Education Records Office in the Stanfield Special Services Building.

Once available, the parent(s)/guardian(s) will be contacted and notified that the student records are ready for pick up. Parent(s)/guardian(s) must bring identification (such as a state issued drivers license or other state issued identification card) in order to pick up the confidential special education records.

Should you have any questions or concerns, please feel free to contact our office for further assistance. See below for additional contact details.

boy writing

Transition services and planning
Transition services are intended to prepare students to move from the world of school to the world of adulthood. The planning process considers student strengths, needs, abilities, and interests, and helps address employment, education and training, independent living skills, and community participation. State and federal law mandates transition planning for special education students to begin prior to their 14th birthday. To facilitate a successful process, Snyder ISD provides transition inventories, checklists, Career Cruising Plans, and other valuable transition assessments, to assist with planning. Transition is of fundamental importance to cultivating a continued success for students as they exit the school environment. Student services must be documented and put in place by family, student, and school staff, to avoid the student experiencing lack of opportunity to learn and work. To learn more about procedures, personnel, and timelines related to transition activities, please refer to the Snyder ISD Special Services operating procedures for transition and graduation.

Transition and employment services designee
The designee for Snyder ISD is Ms. Carla Derryberry, Special Education Case Manager, Post-Secondary Facilitator, and Transition Specialist.

Transition resources
Transition in Texas provides knowledge of the secondary transition process to facilitate student progress toward attainment of their postsecondary goals. On this site you will find resources for students, parents, educators, and agency resources.

The Texas Transition and Employment Guide (En Español), required by House Bill 617, is intended to provide information for students and their parents on statewide services and programs that assist in the transition to life outside the public school system.

All services provided by SISD through general education, Section 504, special education, and/or other related services, are at no cost to the individual student or parent(s)/guardian(s). If you are concerned about your child’s learning, contact your child’s campus administrator, principal, or teacher(s). You may also contact the district's Director of Special Services. See below for additional contact details.

Beginning with the 2017 school year, the Texas Education Agency (TEA) changed the way it reports special education enrollment in school systems. TEA no longer includes a target for a school system’s total numbers of students in special education as part of state monitoring. For special education representation, TEA only reports on overrepresentation within certain race, ethnicity and disability categories, as required by federal law. School systems cannot use this reporting data to delay, deny or prevent a referral for an evaluation for special education services.


Click the pamphlet below for more information

pamphlet english

pamphlet spanish

A partir del año escolar 2017, la Agencia de Educación de Texas (TEA, por sus siglas en inglés) cambió la forma en que informa la inscripción a la educación especial en sistemas escolares. La TEA ya no incluye un objetivo para el número total de estudiantes en educación especial del sistema escolar como parte de la supervisión del estado.

Para obtener más información, haga clic en el folleto de arriba

The following resources are designed to facilitate greater understanding of the special education process for parent(s)/guardian(s) of students with disabilities.

Struggling students receiving specially designed instruction
For students with disabilities who receive specially designed instruction and who may not be experiencing academic success, the Department of Special Education requires that an Admission, Review, and Dismissal (ARD) meeting be scheduled to address the matter.

In Snyder ISD, each student's Admission, Review, and Dismissal committee (ARDc) will convene to address any reasonable, necessary interventions. The goal is to create a plan to guide academic achievement and positive behavior for students who receive services.

This process applies to students attending school face-to-face or through virtual-learning.

Campuses will reconvene an ARD to design an Individual Education Plan (IEP) under the following conditions:

  1. the student currently receives specially designed instruction in the subject via an IEP goal

  2. the student receives a failing grade in a subject on their report card, and

  3. the student continues to receive a failing grade in that subject on the next progress report

During the ARD meeting, the committee will review the barriers to success in the identified subject or area. Additionally, the committee will review current services to determine if a change is necessary or if additional, reasonable accommodations are necessary to assist the student in making progress towards the IEP goals and the general curriculum.

If you are concerned about your child’s learning, contact your child’s campus administrator, principal, or teacher(s). You may also contact the district's Director of Special Services. See below for contact details.

In order to keep everyone as healthy and as safe as possible, we ask that you follow the rules set by our state and our district.

After thoroughly reviewing the results from the staff and student surveys, we incorporated your feedback into our plans. Top trends among staff and family responses included hand sanitizer readily available, frequent handwashing, temperature checks and screenings for staff and students, social distancing as possible, and limiting visitors. Families also requested staggered entry and exit points and lessons on handwashing. For an overview of protocol plans for the summer, please click here. For a more detailed explanation of protocol and plans for the summer, please click here. We will release fall plans as soon as they are finalized.  

We will institute the safety precautions mentioned above and abide by Governor Abbott’s order regarding masks.

  1. Students and staff in 4th - 8th grades will be required to wear a mask when unable to stay 6 feet from another person.

  2. Students in K-3rd grades may wear a mask, but it is not required. Staff members for these grades will wear a mask when unable to stay 6 feet from another person.

  3. A mask is anything that covers the mouth and nose. This can be a bandana, a neck gaiter, or a cloth mask. Masks must be school appropriate and are subject to administrative approval.

  4. We are encouraging parents to send a mask with their child. We do have masks, but they may find their own to be more comfortable.

Jump Start Summer Camp - For the summer Jump Start program, a staff member will meet students at the car to take the child’s temperature and ask the required screening questions. We are researching more efficient ways to screen for the fall. We know the screening process will take some time. However, the most important safety measure we can take is preventing individuals who may have COVID-19 from entering our schools. SISD will require teachers and staff to use the self-screening tool to check for COVID-19 symptoms before coming onto campus each day. If someone answers yes to these screening questions, they will need to remain home and may return when they  have met the return to work/school requirements.

UIL Activities - Snyder ISD will follow UIL guidelines and recommendations for athletes, coaches, and spectators. UIL Guidance released 7/8/2020

All other in-person summer activities - before entry, SISD requires students and visitors to be asked the following screening questions. SISD will require teachers and staff to use the self-screening tool to check for COVID-19 symptoms before coming onto campus each day. If someone answers yes to these screening questions, they will need to remain home and may return when they have met the return to work/school requirements.

Thank you for trusting us with your children. It is not a responsibility we take lightly. If you have any questions, please contact your child’s campus, the district office at 325-574-8900 or email questions@snyderisd.net.

All protocols are subject to change based on local, state, and federal guidelines. 

SISD SUMMER CAMPS & PROGRAMS | K-12 & 2020 GRADUATES

SISD is excited to announce summer camp and program opportunities for students entering Kindergarten through 12th grade and 2020 graduates!

*The decision to hold camps online or in-person will occur in accordance with CDC, state, and local guidelines and will be determined as we approach the camp start date

9TH - 12TH GRADE AND 2020 GRADUATE CAMPS & PROGRAMS

Don’t miss this opportunity! Snyder and Roscoe High School students, take advantage of these FREE, virtual programs this summer! Register through June 20, 2020.

summer

SUMMER CERT | JUNE 1 - AUGUST 31, 2020

Juniors, seniors, & 2020 Grads through the Summer Cert program you can earn an industry certification in just EIGHT weeks in the following areas:

  • Ag - Commercial Pesticide Applicator

  • OSHA

  • Real Estate Sales Agent

  • Patient Care Technician

  • Google Certified Cloud Professional G Suite

  • Microsoft Office Specialist

  • ServeSafe Manager

  • Adobe Certified Associate Creative

  • Entrepreneurship & Small Business

  • Medical Coding & Billing Specialist

P-TECH PREP | 9TH GRADE: JULY 6-10, 10TH - 12TH GRADE JULY 13-17

Dual-credit and P-Tech freshman - seniors, ONE WEEK will get you set for next year’s courses! The P-Tech Bridge Camp will provide:

  1. TSI test prep

  2. orientation to college software programs used in dual-credit classes

  3. career opportunity exploration

  4. experience with a higher education environment

Camps are free and registration is open through June 20, 2020!

KINDERGARTEN - 8TH GRADE CAMPS & PROGRAMS

CLICK HERE TO ACCESS THE K-8 SUMMER CAMPS WEBSITE

REGISTRATION IS CLOSED FOR SUMMER CAMPS AND PROGRAMS AT SISD. STUDENTS ENTERING KINDERGARTEN THROUGH 8TH GRADES HAVE THREE VIRTUAL CAMP OPPORTUNITIES TO KEEP KIDS ENGAGED AND MINDS SHARP THROUGH THE SUMMER!

summer

SUMMER STEM CAMP | JUNE 1 - JULY 31

LEARNING LAB | JUNE 8 - JULY 10

JUMP START | JULY 13-31

summer

STAY CONNECTED THIS SUMMER! THROUGH JULY 10TH, ALL SNYDER ISD SUMMER CAMPS AND PROGRAMS WILL BE HELD VIRTUALLY. IF YOU DO NOT HAVE A STRONG INTERNET CONNECTION, SNYDER ISD HAS INSTALLED HOTSPOTS THAT YOU CAN USE TO CONNECT TO THE PROGRAMS.

  • INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL FRONT PARKING LOT 3600 EL PASO

  • DAEP CAMPUS PARKING LOT - 3600 APPLE

  • SNYDER ISD BUS BARN-1600 SCOTT AVE

  • SNYDER ISD OLD BUS BARN -30TH AND AVE M